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Pard: An Interrupted Nap

Linda Long, photographer.
Marilyn Reaves, distracter.
U.K. Le Guin, skritcher.

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

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from Ursula K. Le Guin – Book View Cafe Blog http://ift.tt/2uPLiCC
via IFTTT
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“I will be living with chronic pain for the rest of my life. I don’t have the mobility, energy or life options I used to have. I work hard to manage the pain, and I want the medical system to be a respectful and effective partner, not a jailer. The opioid crisis is not my doing.”

- Sonya Huber
(via painmanagementprincess)
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“We are often told that the poor are grateful for charity. Some of them are, no doubt, but the best amongst the poor are never grateful. They are ungrateful, discontented, disobedient, and rebellious. They are quite right to be so. Charity they feel to be a ridiculously inadequate mode of partial restitution, or a sentimental dole, usually accompanied by some impertinent attempt on the part of the sentimentalist to tyrannise over their private lives. Why should they be grateful for the crumbs that fall from the rich man’s table? They should be seated at the board, and are beginning to know it. As for being discontented, a man who would not be discontented with such surroundings and such a low mode of life would be a perfect brute. Disobedience, in the eyes of anyone who has read history, is man’s original virtue. It is through disobedience that progress has been made, through disobedience and through rebellion.”

-

Oscar Wilde, The Soul of Man under Socialism (via prawnofsatan)

Why should they be grateful for the crumbs that fall from the rich man’s table?

(via lierdumoa)

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meetcutemag:

by Monique

image

(image source)

Spoiler Alert!

We get it. Everyone has been raving about the kickass Amazon woman taking down gods and Germans during World War I. Women may have gotten the courage to charge to the front or wield a sword and shield with a suit, but perhaps they may have also nabbed a glimpse of a relationship they should be striving for with a man. Gal Gadot and Chris Pine created a unique on-screen romance as the respective Diana Prince and Steve Trevor, presented in such a way not many other movies have done before.

Both Marvel and DC have given audiences various relationships to gush over, or to fight over, depending on who you ask. Some people want to be swept off their feet a la Lois Lane in all the Superman movies, while some wanted to shout obscenities at the screen when Steve made a move on Sharon Carter (you know, Peggy Carter’s niece?) in Captain America: Civil War. Lots of these arguments stem from how the hell these connections develop on film (seriously, her niece!), but in Wonder Woman, we get to see practically all of Steve and Diana’s relationship bloom in the span of a single two-hour movie. From the moment Steve crashes onto Themyscira to his heroic sacrifice to save innocent lives, the audience gets to experience love and tragedy thanks to how naturally the chemistry develops between him and Diana.

Speaking of whom, Diana’s fish-out-of-water storyline is a perfect starter determinant of whether or not Steve is a decent guy or not. As she is thrown into an unknown world in a state of despair, not once does Steve talk down to her or treat her anything less like, well, a god. In fact, he’s just as curious as she is when it comes to some foreign island inhabited only by women. After all, he did witness all of them defeat a fleet of Germans coming after him without the use of guns or other modern artillery. The movie provides this motif of discovery, despite the hellish conditions surrounding them. Diana gets casual, sometimes funny and sometimes heartbreaking explanations of how the real world and how humankind works. Steve could have easily scoffed at the notion that she didn’t know what a watch was. Instead, he gives her a bumbling definition and later on, a reason for her to keep fighting.

And unlike many other male leads, he isn’t leading. It’s refreshing to watch a man who is genuinely scared of the war, and it doesn’t take the lasso of truth to see that throughout the movie. Steve’s constant pushes to keep Diana from fighting back combines fear with doubtful submission to his superiors’ orders, rather than the establishment of power over her. It works well, because this fear eventually evolves into the courage he needs to help Diana and the rest of the war effort. Side by side, they teach and assist each other how to move forward with their goals—Steve to protect innocent lives, and for Diana to defeat the god of war, Ares. The way he mirrors the shield technique from their battle on Themyscira in the battle to reclaim Veld is a beautiful (and very epic) display of what he was able to do to help her reach both their goals.

Ultimately, Diana learns the meaning of self-sacrifice and love thanks to what Steve was striving for. You can pinpoint the moment when everyone’s hearts, including Diana’s, shattered when that plane exploded while he was on board. Tragic.

The best part about Wonder Woman, if that can even be a thing since the whole movie was the best part, was that there wasn’t a huge whoop about their relationship development. The audience didn’t need some passionate kiss in the rain or some unnecessarily loud declaration of devotion in a public space. We get one kiss when they’re alone together, following their dance in the middle of the Belgian village they reclaimed hours earlier. The latter itself felt more intimate than the kiss; Steve is as vulnerable as ever with Diana, revealing that he doesn’t know what normal feels like after everything that’s happened in this war. Much like many of the scenes of torment and despair around her, Diana gets further insight of how war breaks people. After living for so long in peace and growing up peacefully with the most powerful women on the planet, it’s a shot straight to her heart. And the audience’s.

Cheesy as it is, it’s true what Diana says by the end of the film: love can save the world. In a time of unrest and continuing inequality, it’s important that we can at least find the time to understand each other and not be so concerned about power and greed and everything else that tempts us to turn into complete jackasses. Steve was a patient, compassionate gentleman who was able to learn from Diana, and she was able to do the same after being with him. A relationship isn’t a competition or an excuse to display all your best qualities—it’s a team effort that when combined, makes all parties stronger. Wonder Woman wins when it comes to a well-written, well-developed relationship. Without all the fuss and fluff, we get amazing, dynamic characters that will hopefully influence audiences in finding love with the right people.

______________________________________________________________

About the writer | Creative, hungry, and perpetually tired, Monique is a human being with interests spanning from life science to the finer points of fanfiction. When she isn’t doing her best to meet a deadline as early as possible, she’s either unsuccessfully flipping an omelet or binge watching the latest anime. You can find her hiding from the summer heat, winging her eyeliner while ordering pineapple on pizza.

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olderthannetfic:

ask-anxietyhorrorborn:

ask-anxietyhorrorborn:

crandberrycrush:

unwrapping:

Age Ranges of Tumblr’s Global Audience:
Tumblr sees about 150 million global unique visitors monthly. comScore, an Internet analytics firm, averaged Tumblr’s age ranges over the first quarter of 2014 for both Dashboard and blog network traffic worldwide:

  • Ages 13 to 17: 15%
  • Ages 18 to 34: 41%
  • Ages 35 to 54: 29%
  • Ages 55 and up: 15%

“People are often really surprised to note that we have the same percentage of 55-plus-year-olds as we do 13-to-17-year-olds,” said Danielle Strle (strle), Tumblr’s director of product for community and content, in an NPR webinar. “But over half of our audience is solidly in the 13-to-34 demographic.”

This is interesting and comforting. 

Im 12..do i not exist?

im never letting this go, i am 12, i act older, but like, im mother fucking 12.

You have to be 13 to make an account on most websites for legal reasons. If they realize there are younger users, they’ll kick them off for the users’ own protection and because of legal liability. So, yes, any stats are going to assume that all users are at least 13.

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lierdumoa:

ask-anxietyhorrorborn:

crandberrycrush:

unwrapping:

Age Ranges of Tumblr’s Global Audience:
Tumblr sees about 150 million global unique visitors monthly. comScore, an Internet analytics firm, averaged Tumblr’s age ranges over the first quarter of 2014 for both Dashboard and blog network traffic worldwide:

  • Ages 13 to 17: 15%
  • Ages 18 to 34: 41%
  • Ages 35 to 54: 29%
  • Ages 55 and up: 15%

“People are often really surprised to note that we have the same percentage of 55-plus-year-olds as we do 13-to-17-year-olds,” said Danielle Strle (strle), Tumblr’s director of product for community and content, in an NPR webinar. “But over half of our audience is solidly in the 13-to-34 demographic.”

This is interesting and comforting. 

Im 12..do i not exist?

It’s literally illegal for people under 13 to use tumblr, or most social media services, thanks to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule (“COPPA”). It says so in the tumblr terms of service.

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thefandometrics:

ICYMI: Wynonna Earp was renewed for season 3. We met with the cast and crew about an hour after the news hit to catch their reactions. 

Big mood.

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doomsniffer:

mikkeneko:

tilthat:

TIL that a cat once co-authored a physics paper. In 1975, a physicist had just finished writing a paper and was ready to publish but realized that he had used ‘we’ instead of ‘I’ throughout, despite being the sole author. Not wanting to edit the paper, he listed his cat, Chester, as a co-author.

via http://ift.tt/2pvbu4c

This is the cat, by the way: 

I trust him

Ok but the best part is, physicists loved the joke. When people called the author’s university and he wasn’t available, they’d ask to speak with the co-author instead. The author issued a limited number of copies of the article signed by both authors. (Chester’s was obviously a pawprint.) And to this day, physics papers will often have F.D.C Willard (Felix Domesticus, Chester Williard [Willard was the author’s father’s name]) mentioned in the footnotes thanking his “useful contributions to the discussion”.

morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
[personal profile] morgandawn
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/2uOLmCL on July 23, 2017 at 07:49PM

Tags:IFTTT, Fauxthentic History, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
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jonlovett:

brainstatic:

Remember in one of the debates when Trump and Clinton were asked to say something nice about the other, and Clinton said Trump’s children prove his character? It took 10 months for that burn to manifest but the payoff was worth it.

i can’t believe hillary clinton invented foreshadowing

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archiemcphee:

We thought filmmaker George Miller had been working on Mad Max: Fury Road was in the making for about 30 years, but some shiny new evidence has come to light that suggesting the film was in the making for millennia. Japanese artist (and sometime War Boy) Takumi created this awesome illustration depicting the plot of the movie in the style of Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs. The clever piece of fan art, described by Takumi on Twitter as the “complete Mad Max mythology,” is packed with characters details from the film.

Takumi also shared black and white drawings of the piece on his Facebook page:

image
image
image

[via Uproxx]

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olderthannetfic:

expo63:

olderthannetfic:

expo63:

tppfandomstats:

Age and Experience in Fandom*

*English-reading online transformative fandom often using AO3 and tumblr and willing to complete surveys :)

This month’s @threepatchpodcast​ episode, When I’m 64, looks at fandom and aging. To go along with these discussions, here are some demographic stats from a few fandom surveys on the age distribution in our online fandom communities. 

CAVEAT: These surveys are not random samples of the transformative fandom population. All numbers come from voluntary online surveys distributed on social media and fandom media, and the limits of opportunity and inclination introduced biases (more on that for the F&S survey here). Still, it’s the best data we have, so here is what @fffinnagain​ is willing to infer.

From these survey results we can draw a few main points: 

  • Fans’ ages range from preteens to late sixties and beyond
  • Many (possibly most) are in their 20′s and 30′s
  • Most of us started engaging in things we fan over by the age of 19
  • But new fans can be of any age
  • For adult fans, there is a fairly even chance they’ve been in fandom for less than 3 years (~5-10% by our counts)

The usual plots and explanations below.

How old are these fans?

Whatever our expectations, responses to fandom surveys show that these fanfiction readers seem to be mostly in their twenties and thirties, but there is no apparent upper bound on age in these communities. 

From the 2013 AO3 census (11k participants), the average age was 25, with a median of 22-24, and a mode age of 21. 4% were under the age of 16 and 19% of participants in the the AO3 census reported being 30+.

However, the distribution of age depends a lot on community. Our small TPP listener survey in 2015 (230 participants) showed an older demographic: 55% of participants were 30 and above, with a strong mode between 28 and 32. Also, approximately 12% were over the age of 50.

TPP’s fandom and sexuality survey (2195 participants) limited its participant pool to fans 18 and over, but the trends fall somewhere between these two. Average age of 28, mode of 25, and 40% over 30. The distribution of those responses is plotted above.

While none of these surveys capture these online fandom communities cleanly, the consistency of the pattern strengthens their claim: the largest age bracket are people in their 20′s, with substantial presence of teens and people in their 30′s. In all three surveys, more than 50% were between 20 and 40. Fans above the age of 40 are not as common, making up somewhere between 5% and 35% of the active population, depending on the community.

How long have these fans been in fandom?

The fandom and sexuality survey included questions about fans’ first experiences, including the age they started engaging with fandom stuff. 

image

By 19, 70.9% of the F&S survey participants had begun their first forays into fandom life! These early experiences may not have been within the same communities they currently inhabit, but the enthusiasm for transformative works starts young, and opportunity may be an important factor in who gets involved when.

From this we can run a quick calculation: how long has it’s been since their first fandom experiences? Across these 2195 fans, the median time since first fandom was 11 years, mode of 15. We can’t assume that all participants have been consuming fanworks continuously since first contact, however these responses make it obvious that interest in fanfiction, fan art, etc., is not restricted to the eight years of teenage-hood.

There is a long tail in this graph, with small but tangible numbers of people coming into this part of fandom in the 40′s and 50′s. Are older fans more or less likely to be recent inductees?

image

To look at this from a different angle, we broke the participants into age brackets. This figure reports the percentage of each age bracket with X number of years since their first fandom.

The most important spot here is the first clump of columns: fans that have been involved in fandom less than 3 years. These are the newbies. Quite strikingly, they are pretty even across these groups: ~5-10% survey participants in each bracket were relatively new to fandom!  

If I (@fffinnagain) were to hazard a guess, the ratio of active fans with less than 3 years experience is probably higher than 1 in 10. The F & S survey was long and serious and I can imagine a larger portion of newer fans would have felt unsure of whether their experience was relevant. Not everyone steps on to a scene and owns it within 12 months! However, I wouldn’t assume this factor would interact significantly with age, so it still seems fair to extrapolate that within these age bracket, the proportion of new fans is still consistent. Teenagers, however, would be a different story and this data sadly cannot speak to their experiences.

All this suggests that when we meet adult fans, be they in their 20’s, 30’s, 40’s, or older, there is a pretty even chance that they are still getting acclimatized to this culture. So be kind, and don’t assume one way or the other.

All this suggests that when we meet adult fans … there is a pretty even chance that they are still getting acclimatized to this culture’: *raises hand*

Hah. You know, I think you told me that, but I always think everyone is an old hand. Good on you!

@olderthannetfic Ha – well – there’s also a longer/more nuanced version of what I said above. But I’ve tried posting about that before – and the attempt did virtually nothing to shift my sense that I’m a chronic outsider in relation to ‘proper’ Big Media Fandom(s).

Much depends on how you define ‘involved in fandom’ – and I am absolutely one of the people ‘unsure of whether their experience was relevant’. 

Keep reading

Wow, I know Tumblr is not good at longform discussion, but I had forgotten that it gives you a readmore link on a reblog, so you have to keep the actual post open in another window to respond to it. (Damn it, tumblr!)

You make a good point about different experiences of fannishness. Once upon a time, we talked about “Media Fandom”, and while the term is hardly transparent to a modern audience, it did refer to a specific sort of community that isn’t terribly hard to define in practice. Now, I think people usually fall back on a fic-centric definition for lack of anything clearer. (So if I’m trying to define “in fandom” in some very narrow sense, I’ll do it in relation to communities that produce fanfic or the person in question producing/consuming fanfic. Anything else gets labeled ‘fannish’ or ‘geeky’ but possibly not ‘in fandom’ in this sense.)

Keep reading

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nehirose:

ilyasaurus:

extrajordinary:

GUYS. THERE WAS DRIVE-THROUGH IN ANCIENT ROME. FINDING OUT THIS ALONE IS WORTH THE COST OF MY MASTERS IN HISTORY.

[From Daily Life of the Ancient Romans by David Matz]

@boysinqueens ancient taco bell tho

FAST FOOD IS NOT A MODERN INVENTION WOULD YOU LOOK AT THAT.

Vividcon

Jul. 23rd, 2017 10:35 am
morgandawn: (Vid Free! As Free As The Wind Blows...)
[personal profile] morgandawn
 Who is going? Can't wait to see you all.
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crimsonclad:

The thing about Persuasion that just kills me is that the central premise— “I hope the person who broke my heart has a miserable life and I get to watch them be humiliated while I get everything I ever wanted” is so universal.

But Wentworth is only able to fully enjoy it for like A DAY before he starts realizing how terrible it is. He watches Anne suffer in silence and he hates it. He watches her being treated like an inconvenience and a joke and a piece of furniture and he hates it. He hears sneering comments at her expense and he hates it. He spends evening after evening in her company, where he is celebrated as a handsome, dashing hero while she is shoved to the side and ignored and he hates it.

He probably spent a lot of heartbroken hours out on the sea wishing revenge on her (like ten years’ worth), but then he gets to see it happening and revenge turns out not to be that sweet after all. He probably thought “I hope she never gets married to anyone else and she has to spend the rest of her miserable life with her miserable family, listening to them talk about nothing and regretting ever letting me go.” But then he has to watch her live through it, and it is just excruciating. Watching her bite her tongue. Watching her keep her eyes down on her clasped hands. Watching her silently accept everything as if she deserves it.

He’s like, “YES, it’s all HAPPENING! She’s all ALONE and PALE and OLD and…sad. And her family treats her terribly, and she’s— no one is talking to her. No one even knows that she’s funny and smart, they just— they just make her sit in the corner. She’s hardly eating anything. And she really isn’t that old, but they are acting like she’s dead? Her family is even worse than they used to be, how is that even possible? Why isn’t anyone helping her? Why is she the only person taking care of anyone? Why isn’t anyone taking care of her?”

And his nasty “she’s so altered I should not have known her again” comment that he KNOWS got back to her starts ringing in his ears. And his cocky “yeah I’m just here to find a YOUNG, HOT girl to marry now that I’m SUCH A CATCH, whatevs” approach starts to make him feel queasy, because she’s HELPING, she’s trying to stay out of his way and help him pick a young wife, and she hardly ever smiles anymore, not really. He watches her slip out of rooms when he enters them and he hears her laughing with her nephew sometimes but then go quiet when anyone else approaches, and he doesn’t know what to do.

Anyway, every fandom has a bunch of Pride and Prejudice AUs, but I WANT PERSUASION AUS. I NEED THEM. I NEED THEM. 

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unwrapping:

Age Ranges of Tumblr’s Global Audience:
Tumblr sees about 150 million global unique visitors monthly. comScore, an Internet analytics firm, averaged Tumblr’s age ranges over the first quarter of 2014 for both Dashboard and blog network traffic worldwide:

  • Ages 13 to 17: 15%
  • Ages 18 to 34: 41%
  • Ages 35 to 54: 29%
  • Ages 55 and up: 15%

“People are often really surprised to note that we have the same percentage of 55-plus-year-olds as we do 13-to-17-year-olds,” said Danielle Strle (strle), Tumblr’s director of product for community and content, in an NPR webinar. “But over half of our audience is solidly in the 13-to-34 demographic.”

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